Building my dream house in Google Sketch-Up

Lots of fun in Google Sketch-Up this week.  I started out trying to recreate some of the buildings at Chatham Historic Dockyard in England .  I was there last fall and fell in love with the place.  I quickly became sidetracked though with all the fun tools that Sketch-Up has to offer and ended up building two “dream homes” for myself.  The only thing I had trouble with was ordering certain objects in my creations (like bringing the roof to the front of the screen so it didn’t look like the house was swallowing it.)  Still more work to go, but lots of fun.

Still amazed by all the awesome maps that LOC’s Mapping and Geography Division holds.  I was pleasantly surprised to find they had a number of recent maps from foreign countries, although they still don’t appear to have the specific maps I’m looking for.  I’ll definitely be going back though…we just got a new digital camera at work that has all the bells and whistles and I can’t wait to use it in the map room.

I was thinking about the way the Sanborn maps classify the types of houses incorporated within them.  When we do our reconstructions, we can texturize the buildings with the proper material (like metal or brick.)  What about the buildings we’re unsure of though.  I seem to recall that Ed, our host in the map room said most the building types were laid out in a map key, but occasionally he ran across some colors that were not defined.  What’s the correct procedure when you are recreating a buildings off of something like a Sanborn map and you don’t know the original material used to build it.  Do you guess, or do you just paint the building in Sketch-Up the same color as the building on the Sanborn and explain in the key.;  It seems like kind of a silly question…my co-workers would say “who cares.” But the more I think about it, the more I realize how easily parts of the map could fall to “revisionist” history through Sketch-Up if not properly watched…

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